Port Honduras Marine Reserve

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Chapter 5. CULTURAL AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC CRITERIA

(Guidelines and Criteria Section B / Cultural and Socio-Economic Criteria) Nominated Areas must conform, where applicable, to at least one of the three Cultural and Socio-Economic Criteria. If applicable, describe how the nominated site satisfies one or more of the following three Criteria (Attach in Annex any specific and relevant documents in support of these criteria).

Productivity:


PHMR is a highly productive coastal environment that supports a number of commercial fisheries, including queen conch (Strombus gigas), spiny lobster (Panulirus argus), sea cucumber (Holothuria mexicana), lane snapper (Lutjanus synagris), white grunt (Haemulon plumierii), yellowtail snapper (Ocyurus chrysurus), snook (Centropomus undecimalis), and several other snappers and groupers.

In 2005, the total annual value of the PHMR fishery was estimated at US$445,000 (Coleman & Diamond 2005). The most productive fishery within PHMR in economic terms is for lobster, (caught with nets, traps and by diving) generating an estimated US$254,000 per year (57% of the total value of the PHMR fishery) (Coleman & Diamond 2005). Lobsters are caught mainly on the deep-water banks associated with the Snake Cayes.

Cultural and traditional use:


The main traditional livelihood system of all three communities adjacent to PHMR is fishing. The sustainability of this economic activity depends upon the management of the commercial species within. One of the main goals of the protected area is protect the ecosystems and increase/stabilize the populations of species upon which traditional fishing depends.

 

Socio-economic benefits:


In 2005, the total annual value of the PHMR fishery was estimated at US$445,000 (Coleman & Diamond 2005). The most productive fishery within PHMR in economic terms is for lobster, (caught with nets, traps and by diving) generating an estimated US$254,000 per year (57% of the total value of the PHMR fishery) (Coleman & Diamond 2005). Lobsters are caught mainly on the deep-water banks associated with the Snake Cayes.

 It was estimated that tour guides generated an annual profit of US$237,000 (Coleman & Diamond, 2005). Inclusion of the primary private fly fishing company, El Pescador, increases the total revenue generated using PHMR to over US$695,000 (Coleman & Diamond, 2005).

A 2009 study found that 59% of the local population consumes locally caught seafood at least twice per week, providing an important source of protein.

In addition to foreign tourists, hundreds of local people enjoy the MPA each year for recreation.