Seaflower Marine Protected Area

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Chapter 3. SITE DESCRIPTION

f - Impacts and threats affecting the area

Impacts and threats within the area


Impact and threats level Evolution In the short term Evolution In the long term Species affected Habitats affected Description / comments
Exploitation of natural ressources: Fishing very important increase decrease Queen conch Reef fish Shore birds Artisanal fishers traditionally used fishing methods and practices that were in general sustainable. They have lobbied to limit industrial fishing to selected sites in the Northern Section only and to ban the use of destructive industrial methods such as long lines and drag nets in the entire MPA. However, the sheer number of users and growing poverty now mean that even traditional methods contribute to overfishing. Consequently, MPA management measures include closed seasons for key species such as lobster and conch, protection of spawning sites and aggregations, size limits and quotas, and bans on fisheries of threatened and endangered species such as sea turtles, sharks, etc. in addition to the use of no-entry and no-take zones to balance use with conservation. Fisheries are known to be over-exploited. Research has been carried out on queen conch and some species of reef fish as well as on sea and shore birds, which are sometimes exploited for their eggs. Limited studies are currently being done but more research is needed to improve the quality and availability of scientific information and data to better inform MPA management. In 2009, especially significant was the study that was done on queen conch and information gathered from monitoring of fisheries by the Secretary of Fisheries, but carrying out more research is an urgent need.
Exploitation of natural ressources: Agriculture limited not specified not specified Not commented
Exploitation of natural ressources: Tourism significant increase increase Unsustainable tourism practices such as poor diving techniques, groundings from watercraft, and overuse of popular sites, also impact biodiversity and ecosystem condition.
Exploitation of natural ressources: Industry limited not specified not specified Not commented
Exploitation of natural ressources: Forest products limited not specified not specified Not commented
Increased population limited not specified not specified Not commented
Invasive alien species very important increase increase In addition to the local drivers, marine ecosystems have been increasingly affected in recent years by global drivers of biodiversity loss including introduced species (e.g., lion fish)
Pollution limited not specified not specified Not commented
Other limited not specified not specified Not commented

Impacts and threats around the area


Impact and threats Level Evolution In the short term Evolution In the long term Species affected Habitats affected Description / comments
Exploitation of natural ressources: Fishing limited not specified not specified Not commented
Exploitation of natural ressources: Agriculture limited not specified not specified Not commented
Exploitation of natural ressources: Tourism limited not specified not specified Not commented
Exploitation of natural ressources: Industry limited not specified not specified Not commented
Exploitation of natural ressources: Forest products limited not specified not specified Not commented
Increased population limited not specified not specified Not commented
Invasive alien species limited not specified not specified Not commented
Pollution significant not specified not specified Although water quality is improving from better managed waste disposal on land, there is still non-point source pollution in coastal waters from uncontrolled dumping of solid waste, discharge of liquid waste, and runoff of contaminated storm water directly into the sea and mangroves or as carried by gullies.
Other limited not specified not specified Not commented