Everglade National Park

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Chapter 3. SITE DESCRIPTION

f - Impacts and threats affecting the area

Impacts and threats within the area


Impact and threats level Evolution In the short term Evolution In the long term Species affected Habitats affected Description / comments
Exploitation of natural ressources: Fishing very important unknown unknown Commercial fishing has not been permitted in the park since 1985 and commercial ventures involving forest products/logging.
Exploitation of natural ressources: Agriculture very important unknown unknown Agriculture is not permitted inside the park.
Exploitation of natural ressources: Tourism very important unknown unknown Not commented
Exploitation of natural ressources: Industry very important unknown decrease Not commented
Exploitation of natural ressources: Forest products very important increase unknown Not commented
Increased population very important unknown unknown Everglades National Park is surrounded by Miami-Dade (~ 2.50 million residents), Broward (~ 1.75 million residents), and Collier (~ 0.32 million residents) Counties. The demands of these 4.5 million residents exert a significant impact on the resources of Everglades National Park, presumably mostly on air quality and water quantity and quality.
Invasive alien species very important unknown unknown Non-native (exotic) plants are a significant threat to the native plant communities of Everglades National Park. Approximately 1,000 plant species have been recorded in the park. Of these, over 220 species are non-native. Exotic invasive pythons have altered the food web of the Everglades: this species is a top predator, and feeds on a broad variety of native species. Exotic fish species are widespread in freshwater marshes, although we have not determined that the species are negatively affecting native fish populations. Because control methods for exotic freshwater fish in the marsh are scarce or non-existent, these species may remain in the Everglades freshwater fish community for a very long time. The presence of lionfish (Pterois volitans) in Florida Bay is cause for concern: this species is also a top predator, and has been shown in other locations to have negative effects on populations of native fishes.
Pollution very important unknown unknown Everglades National Park is surrounded by Miami-Dade (~ 2.50 million residents), Broward (~ 1.75 million residents), and Collier (~ 0.32 million residents) Counties. The demands of these 4.5 million residents exert a significant impact on the resources of Everglades National Park, presumably mostly on air quality and water quantity and quality.
Other very important unknown unknown Not commented

Impacts and threats around the area


Impact and threats Level Evolution In the short term Evolution In the long term Species affected Habitats affected Description / comments
Exploitation of natural ressources: Fishing very important unknown unknown Not commented
Exploitation of natural ressources: Agriculture very important unknown unknown Not commented
Exploitation of natural ressources: Tourism very important unknown unknown Not commented
Exploitation of natural ressources: Industry very important unknown unknown Not commented
Exploitation of natural ressources: Forest products very important unknown unknown Not commented
Increased population very important increase increase Everglades National Park is surrounded by Miami-Dade (~ 2.50 million residents), Broward (~ 1.75 million residents), and Collier (~ 0.32 million residents) Counties. The demands of these 4.5 million residents exert a significant impact on the resources of Everglades National Park, presumably mostly on air quality and water quantity and quality.
Invasive alien species very important unknown unknown Not commented
Pollution very important unknown unknown Not commented
Other very important unknown unknown Not commented