Dry Tortugas National Park (DTNP)

Note: The data were entered in the language of the country of origin (English, French or Spanish) and there is no translation available yet.

Chapter 3. SITE DESCRIPTION

d - Human population and current activities

Inhabitants inside the area or in the zone of potential direct impact on the protected area:


Inside the area In the zone of potential direct impact
Permanent Seasonal Permanent Seasonal
Inhabitants not given not given not given not given

Comments about the previous table:


No human development or inhabitants other than park facilities, staff, volunteers and visitors.

Description of population, current human uses and development:


DTNP received 53,890 visitors in 2010. Day use in and around Fort Jefferson on Garden Key is the most frequent use. Most visitors access the Park by the commercial passenger ferry service from Key West, Florida. Other visitors access the DTNP in private boats or by commercial seaplane. Private boats using the Park must obtain a permit. Visitors enjoy boating, scuba diving, snorkeling, fishing, birdwatching, photography, camping and tours of the fort.

Activities Current human uses Possible development Description / comments, if any
Tourism significant unknown DTNP received 53,890 visitors in 2010.
Fishing significant unknown
Agriculture absent unknown
Industry absent unknown
Forestry absent unknown
Others significant unknown Visitors enjoy boating, scuba diving, snorkeling, fishing, birdwatching, photography, camping and tours of the fort.

e - Other relevant features

The Dry Tortugas were discovered by the Spanish explorer Ponce de Leon in 1513 and were so named to indicate they lacked fresh water. Loggerhead Key was the location of the Carnegie Institute's Laboratory for Marine Biology from 1905 to 1939, where researchers first described, photographed and illustrated many species of marine invertebrates, fish, and algae common to the Caribbean and South Florida. Built between 1846 and 1875, Fort Jefferson is the largest, all-masonry military fort in the United States, and is listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. Significant preservation and restoration programs conserve and interpret the fort, cannons, lighthouse and other historic structures and artifacts. Because of its location on shipping routes to the Gulf of Mexico and navigational hazards posed by reefs, DTNP also protects numerous significant shipwrecks and submerged cultural resources representing centuries of maritime commerce and history.